Albatross Chick Hats for Sale

When I first made TrossHat it hadn’t occurred to me that other people would be interested in having one as well, but I’ve had a number of requests and am now doing my best to make a small number of albatross chick hats for those interested in purchasing one.

I knit each hat from two yarns: a super-bulky wool/acrylic blend and polyester eyelash-style yarn. The super-bulky yarn gives the hat shape and the eyelash yarn gives it fluff. After I’ve knit the body of the hat and wings and sewn the latter into place I make the face and feet with a combination of felting techniques. The face and feet are attached with pin backs so that they can be removed if the hat needs a wash.

The hats are one-size-fits-most. I haven’t made a child-size pattern yet. The current hats are suitable for adults to wear. Due to small pieces (button eyes, pin backs) I do not recommend these hats for small children. If you are interested in a child-size hat with sewn on felt elements and embroidered eyes please let me know! I’m considering working up an appropriate pattern.

The nitty gritty:

$155 US plus shipping and handling per hat

Orders will be completed as I am able. Due to the time required to make each hat I can’t guarantee quick delivery.

If you would like to order a hat or have any questions please contact me through my contact page on this site or through Twitter (@rownsmith).

Thank you!

knitting needles and yarn
The beginning of knitting a TrossHat
The face is backed with two lapel pins, one behind each eye. These keep the face firmly in place.
The face is backed with two lapel pins, one behind each eye. These keep the face firmly in place.
Partially finished felt elements (face and beak) tested for fit on hat.
The felt elements are tested for scale on the hat.
Each foot is attached to the hat with a brooch-style pin.
Each foot is attached to the hat with a brooch-style pin.
TrossHat is indeed warm. The brim flips up to reveal the feet.
TrossHat is indeed warm. The brim flips up to reveal the feet.
When your albatross chick hat isn't on your head s/he can keep you company sitting on display. Lei, visor and cold beverage optional.
When your albatross chick hat isn’t on your head s/he can keep you company sitting on display. Lei, visor and cold beverage optional.

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TrossHat’s Origins

Sometime in 2014 when I first became acquainted with albatross chicks I thought to myself that their body shape would translate well into a knit hat. This may seem like an odd train of thought and I don’t really have an excuse for it. Welcome to my brain.

The process from that first thought to the finished hat was a long one. I started by learning to needle felt because I thought it was a technique that would work well for sculpting the hat’s face and feet. My adventures in needle felting went off in another albatross-related direction but I never forgot my original reason for learning the technique.

I worried over yarn selection. I knew I wanted the hat to be fluffy but I wasn’t sure how best to capture the complexity of the chicks’ down. Ultimately I decided to keep it simple and settled on some eyelash yarn that was sold at a reasonable price point. This hat was going to be an experiment and I was reluctant to work with some of the beautiful but much more expensive yarns out there.

I made up the hat pattern as I went along. I cast on stitches based on the yarn and rough size I wanted for the finished hat and went from there. I have enough experience knitting to know some options for reducing stitches in a row so I used that knowledge to gradually shape the chick hat’s neck and head. I knit the wings separately and stitched them into place. Finally I felted the face and feet, adding button eyes, and stitched those into place as well. Finished!

The only notes I took through this process were on wing pattern since I wanted the two wings to match. I intended the hat to be a one-off, unique item, never thinking that other people would be as excited about it as I was.

In December 2016, shortly after I finished the albatross chick hat (now dubbed TrossHat) I knit it a Santa hat. The hat-wearing-a-hat idea was silly and fun and I wasn’t the only one to get a kick out of it, so I made more and TrossHat’s fame spread.

I decided to make a hat a month for TrossHat for 2017. It’s been a delightful project so far, giving me opportunities to explore additional craft materials and processes. The year isn’t finished yet and I have a whole list of hats yet to make!

During these hot summer months TrossHat keeps me company on my desk or elsewhere around the house, sitting with that stoic albatross patience (and often wearing the latest hat).

Cat and half-knit hat sit together on a desk.
Keppo sits next to the half-finished hat for scale.
Albtross chick hat, knitting partially finished, testing fit on head
A fit check, knitting still in progress.
Partially finished felt elements (face and beak) tested for fit on hat.
The felt elements are tested for scale on the hat.

 

Knit albatross chick hat worn on head
The newly-finished albatross chick hat.

 

Albatross chick hat wearing knit Santa hat
The albatross chick hat wearing a knit Santa hat. The beginning of a new project.

 

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